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Voices From the Gaps
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Essays

Diane Glancy's Sacajawea Character Analysis
Bird Woman. Sah-kah-gar we a. Boat Pusher. Sahcahgagwea. Token of Peace. Squar. Sacajawea.

With such an abundance of names, it is not surprising that Sacajawea, the Shoshoni woman who traveled with the Lewis and Clark expedition, struggled with her identity. The inner conflict Sacajawea battled with is analyzed as Sarah King interprets her character in Diane Glancy's Stone Heart: A Novel of Sacajawea. Focusing on the evolution of Sacajawea's growing presence through verbal and nonverbal communication Ann McKenzie discusses in an analysis of Sacajawea based on the same novel. A voice otherwise lost, and a woman previously only remembered in myth are sought and memorialized in Glancy's beautiful depiction, a novel of Sacajawea.

Dwelling through the Land
"Diane Glancy's Stone Heart: A Novel of Sacajawea depicts the tension between the white explorers, Lewis and Clark, and a Shoshoni woman known as Sacajawea. . .Sacajawea's journey as depicted in Glancy's novel illustrates the buffalo as the Plains Indians' ever-present connection to home. "

Herald the Day: Calling for a Change in the Landscape of American Fiction
Although there is a universal acknowledgement of the degree to which hegemonic discourse has limited minority voices by romanticizing, categorizing, and limiting their ability to situate themselves outside these configurations, I can find few examples that call for a new manipulation of the categories "minority" and "woman" within the realm of fiction.

Historical Essay: Ayako Ishigaki
"Journalist, biographer, activist for peace, social justice and women's rights (Ishigaki, back cover), Ayako Ishigaki was born in Tokyo, Japan in 1903. "

Web Feminism, Theory and Practice: Negotiating the Academy with VG/Voices from the Gaps
During the last two years, the four of us have been involved in the maintenance, redesign, update, and expansion of VG/Voices from the Gaps, a University of Minnesota website devoted to student writing on the lives and work of women writers and artists of color. This process has demanded that we theorize the website, as well, as we have come to realize that VG presents both potential and pitfalls to women, as artists and scholars, negotiating the academy. . .